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Plan Your Garden And Plan To Cultivate - 20 Apr 2018 03:46

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gardening advice

When you know that you're ready to start a garden, you need to find the perfect spot. You might be limited to having a little container garden if space is at a premium. Finding the best garden spot is determined by the amount of sunlight the area receives, with the best option being exposure from the south. Steer clear of positioning your garden where it would receive exposure from the north unless it is your only option because this will severely hamper a success of your garden.

Using the southern site, where the sun sits warm all day, you should run the rows of vegetables north and south. Doing the work this way enables the morning sun's rays to reach the eastern side of the plants, and in the afternoon, the western side. This particular layout will help your plants to cultivate evenly. If the garden faces southeast, then the western sun is out of the problem, and you need to run your rows northwest and southwest to get the best distribution of sunlight.

If at all possible, the sunlight should be uniformly dispersed for the maximum available time. Undoubtedly you've seen the results of what happens when plants don't receive well distributed sunlight if you've looked at a window plant that lists more to one side than the other. Knowing where you will place your garden, sketch out a drawing of where you want each plant to go. In the beginning, the dirt in your garden plot will most likely be concealed underneath sod or other debris. You need to break the ground and turn the sod under if you will have a large garden, whereas all you need to do is remove the sod if the garden will be fairly small.

The sod can be taken and put into a pile to rot as a compost pile, to be used as fertilizer. You can contribute vegetable waste materials to your compost stack during the summer and autumn leaves during the fall. This garden compost provides garden fertilizer for the following year. It's essential to remove any large clumps from your garden location by sufficiently plowing the sod under. The soil should be made up of fine particles so that the seeds will grow properly. All it takes for getting your garden begun is a spade, a hoe, and a rake.

The spade can turn the garden soil in the first place, but it will leave too many clumps. A hoe will be helpful in eliminating the remaining clumps and will better prepare the soil. Using the spade is going to be strenuous, hard work, but using a hoe and a rake will not be that vigorous. Once the hoe work is finished, you then use the rake to make the bed fine and smooth. After you have this all done, you are prepared to start planting the seeds.

Note The next article is designed for general information and although it is correct at the time of publication you can always visit the owners web site for the up to date news on gardening advice. Thankyou - Comments: 0

Training.gov.au - 17 Mar 2018 19:25

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Minister for Workplace Relations Bill Shorten right this moment announced the appointment of a CEO to head up the new Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency (ASEA), and the appointment of the ten members of the ASEA Council.

Some work place agreements embody a clause which extends the amount of days your employer will top up your pay. Community leave is on the market to each everlasting and informal staff. Brimbank City Council acknowledges the traditional custodians of this land, the Wurundjeri individuals, and pays our respects to elders previous and present. This is by far the most typical impact of publicity to asbestos. Worldwide, 1000's of individuals have died from it and thousands others carry the disease.
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Our concern in this explicit occasion was that your entire cavity above the suspended ceiling was getting used as an air-con return air plenum, exposing the entire building HVAC system and occupants to no matter particles were launched by supplies within the cavity, together with probably asbestos from the older layer of acoustic ceiling tiles. We consider within the free stream of information. We use a Creative Commons Attribution NoDerivatives licence, so you may republish our articles without cost, online or in print.
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Asbestos materials cannot be imported, saved, supplied, offered, put in, used or re-used. The Occupational Health &amp; Safety (Asbestos) Regulations 2007, also specify that only licensed asbestos removalists may take away fastened or installed asbestos-containing material (besides in sure restricted circumstances). Transporting and disposal of asbestos The transport and disposal of asbestos waste is controlled by the Environment Protection Authority, which stipulates the safe handling and disposal through particular licensing.

Unlicensed removing of asbestos can be legally carried out by owners,&nbsp;nevertheless, some jobs are greatest left to the consultants. It is recommended that you simply&nbsp;interact the providers of a licenced&nbsp;asbestos elimination contractor. If you think that your employer is using RMA provisions to bully, you need to converse to your HSR and Union Delegate and ask for assist. If required, they will attend conferences with you to make sure that they are conducted in professional and useful manner. The sort of asbestos fibre. Crocidolite (blue) asbestos and Amosite (brown asbestos) are extra hazardous than Chrysotile (white) asbestos.

Mr Geoff Fary was Chair of the Australian Asbestos Management Review between 2010 and 2012. Prior to this he was Assistant Secretary of the Australian Council of Trade Unions for three years. Mr Fary has additionally held positions as Executive Director of the Association of Professional Engineers Scientists and Managers, Australia (APESMA) and National Vice President of the Industrial Relations Society, Australia. His former board memberships and directorships include Australian Employee Buyout Centre, APESMA Lawyers Pty Ltd, Victorian Government Purchasing Board, Safe Work Australia, Defence Reserves Support National Council and Commissioner for the Australian Safety and Compensation Commission.

Asbestosis causes breathlessness, tightness within the chest, persistent coughing and the pores and skin might have a bluish tinge from lack of oxygen. Getting enough oxygen from each breath wants a much higher effort. Asbestosis normally worsens over time. It can lead to respiratory failure and demise. There is not any remedy for this disease. International Agency for Research on Cancer. IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. Volume 100C: Arsenic, metals, fibres, and dusts. 2009. Accessed at on June 10, 2015. It is disappointing that we now have had to take motion on so many events with firms and people which should know better.

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints - Comments: 0

Licensed Asbestos Removalists - 15 Mar 2018 08:32

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The Benalla Landfill is situated in Old Farnley Road and is open for domestic rubbish on Monday to Friday from midday to 4pm and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4pm.

One of the most important points regarding asbestos in civil process is the latency of asbestos-associated diseases. Most international locations have limitation durations to bar actions that are taken lengthy after the reason for motion has lapsed. For instance, in Malaysia the time period to file a tort motion is six years from the time the tort occurred. Due to several asbestos-associated actions, international locations reminiscent of Australia have amended their laws referring to limitations to accumulate ranging from time of discovery fairly than time when the reason for motion accrued.

Both WorkCover NSW and WorkSafe ACT are at the moment taking steps to analyze this explicit sort of insulation in their jurisdictions. Businesses or homes which are affected are being warned not to undertake any refurbishment work that requires alteration to any partitions, ceilings or wall sockets, or removing of cornices until an extra evaluation underneath controlled conditions might be performed. Licensed asbestos assessors or occupational hygienists can take a look at the level of control in place at your premises to see whether elimination or different controls have to be undertaken.

Later it was found that asbestos posed a critical and often deadly, health risk and its use dwindled in the 1980's, eventually becoming banned in Australia in 2003. Whether you need a number of sheets of asbestos safely removed from a house that you just're renovating, or a large area of asbestos faraway from an industrial site, we have now the experience, licences and insurance required to make sure secure and compliant elimination.

The commonest asbestos related ailments include Mesothelioma, Asbestosis and varied cancers. Symptoms might not appear for 10 to 50 years, and as such, peak mortality charges are anticipated around 2020. If you need extra data or help, please visit the Asbestos Diseases Society of Australia Inc website. The National Training Group can have a free Builders Safety Display on Friday, October 24, from 1pm to 6pm at Currajong.
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The work-associated harm charge in 2009-10 was 53 accidents per 1,000 individuals employed, down from a price of sixty four per 1,000 in 2005-06. The fall within the total work-associated damage charge since 2005-06 was pushed by a reduction among men (from 74 to 55 per 1,000), while the rate amongst ladies remained steady (at fifty one per 1,000). According to Australia's National Dataset for Compensation Based Statistics, the workers who filed essentially the most compensation claims between 2005 and 2008 included carpenters, electricians, power plant staff, plumbers, steel staff and telecommunication employees.
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The Australian Mesothelioma Register displays asbestos publicity amongst trades, in addition to mesothelioma incidence. They say the occupations with the highest publicity threat embody asbestos mining and jobs that produce a number of dust comparable to sawing, sanding, drilling, grinding or handling asbestos-contaminated supplies. Specific high-danger jobs embrace boiler workers, energy plant staff, carpenters, railway staff and naval staff.

Asbestos Exposure &amp; Risk of Developing Asbestos Related Disease - Comments: 0

Asbestos Diseases Research Institute - 13 Mar 2018 18:53

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Years in the past, asbestos brought about serious scare among families in Australia particularly with the arrival of diseases associated to asbestos publicity. Asbestos has been used as a popular materials to build residential and business buildings, including colleges the place your children go to.

Safe Asbestos Group also has its own fleet of skip and tipper vehicles, licensed by the EPA for the protected transport and disposal of asbestos waste. We can deal with your asbestos removal within the Brisbane area from begin to end. Fibro &amp; Asbestos: Frequently asked Questions for Renovators and Homeowners&nbsp;The Guide comprises a safety checklist, steering on safe disposal of fibro and a few basic tips on what to do if fibro is broken. The video was taken at 4 Barrow Place, Lyons by Ben Carvalho. Ben's father Leo was arrested outside the Mr Fluffy demolition site last week after protesting that demolition safeguards weren't being followed.

The company was additionally subjected to courtroom actions by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) and the Australian Tax Office (ATO) over its corporate tactics and actions. Dial Before You Dig is a free national referral service designed to forestall harm and disruption to the huge pipe and cable networks which supplies Australia with essential providers. Friable refers to asbestos that crumbles to powder form when dry. It is highly dangerous. Non-friable asbestos comes combined with other supplies comparable to cement.
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Most individuals who develop mesothelioma have labored in jobs the place they inhaled or ingested asbestos fibers, or had been uncovered to airborne asbestos dust and fibers in different ways. Washing garments of a member of the family who worked with asbestos also creates a risk for developing mesothelioma. Unlike lung cancer, there seems to be no affiliation between mesothelioma and tobacco smoking, however smoking enormously increases the chance of other asbestos-induced cancers.

Mesothelioma: Cancer in the lining of the chest and abdomen. Symptoms don't appear until the disease may be very superior, and it often takes more than 20 years from asbestos exposure to prognosis, so it is tough to deal with and unattainable to cure. Patients often solely survive 10-12 months after prognosis. About 600 people are recognized yearly.

The NSW loose-fill asbestos taskforce&nbsp;boards in Albury and Holbrook this week raised group questions about the Victorian Government's response to this situation. I am writing to thank Zero ASBESTOS in your latest donation to the Mountain Creek State High School. Your type donation was used as a prize and we attracted over a hundred individuals to our profitable fundraising evening.
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Before taking asbestos to a landfill or switch station, contact the power to determine if, when, and below what conditions the facility will accept asbestos. Asbestos abatement contractors who're licensed by the Massachusetts Department of Labor Standards (DLS) may be hired to take away asbestos and take it to an permitted disposal facility. Call the Massachusetts Department of Labor Standards at 617-626-6960 or go to the DLS site for a list of licensed abatement contractors.&nbsp;Asbestos wastes may not be despatched to a municipal stable waste combustion facility or to a construction and demolition (C&amp;D) materials processor.

Asbestos Exposure &amp; Risk of Developing Asbestos Related Disease - Comments: 0

Asbestos Exposure & Risk of Developing Asbestos Related - 04 Mar 2018 22:48

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Asbestos is a naturally occurring rock forming mineral silicate in fibrous form belonging to the serpentine and amphibole groups. It occurs naturally in large deposits on every continent in the world. There are six types of naturally occurring asbestos fibres of which only three have been used commercially in Australia. These included the serpentine: Chrysotile (white asbestos); and the amphiboles: Crocidolite (blue asbestos) and Amosite (brown or grey asbestos). The other three non-commercially used amphiboles included Tremolite, Actinolite and Anthophyllite.

Asbestos has been used in the ancient world of the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. It is believed that as early as 4000 BC, asbestos fibres were used for wicks in lamps and candles. Between 2000-3000 BC, embalmed bodies of Egyptian pharaohs were wrapped in asbestos cloth. The Greeks and Romans documented the harmful effects of asbestos fibres on those who mined the silken material from ancient stone quarries noting a “sickness of the lungs” in slaves who wove asbestos into cloth.

The commercial use of asbestos commenced in the late 1800s in Australia in four main industries including Mining and Milling; Building &amp; Construction (for strengthening cement and plastics, for insulation, fireproofing and sound absorption); Ship Building (eg. insulation of boilers and steampipes) and the Automotive Industry (eg. vehicle brake shoes, gaskets and clutch pads).

There were over 3000 products (Asbestos Containing Materials or ACM) manufactured with asbestos fibres. The ACM fall into two broad categories: friable and non-friable (or bonded).

‘Friable’ is ACM that can be easily reduced to powder when crushed by hand, when dry. These materials can contain higher percentages of asbestos fibres and are easily or more likely to release airborne fibres into the environment with minimal disturbance. As such, they pose a greater risk to health. Friable materials must only be handled and removed by an asbestos removalist with Class A Asbestos Removal Licence. Examples of friable asbestos-containing materials include sprayed on fire retardants, insulation (eg. millboard, pipe insulation), sound proofing, the lining on some old domestic heaters, stoves and hot water systems and associated pipe lagging, the backing of sheet vinyl and linoleum floor coverings, thermal lagging, some vermiculite.

‘Non-friable’, or bonded ACM is used to refer to ACM in which the asbestos is firmly bound in the matrix of the material. These materials are unlikely to release measurable levels of airborne asbestos fibre into the environment if they are undisturbed. Therefore, they generally pose a lower risk to health. However, activities that may abrade the ACM such as drilling, grinding have the potential to release higher concentrations of airborne asbestos fibres into the environment. The non-friable ACM are mainly made up of asbestos fibres together with a bonding compound (such as cement), and typically contain up to 15 per cent asbestos. Non-friable ACM are solid, quite rigid and the asbestos fibres are tightly bound in the material. Non-friable ACM are the most common in domestic houses. They are commonly called ‘fibro’, ‘asbestos cement’ and ‘AC sheeting’. Examples of non-friable ACM include asbestos cement products (flat, profiled and corrugated sheeting used in walls, ceilings and roofs, moulded items such as downpipes) and vinyl floor tiles.

While asbestos is a hazardous material it can only pose a risk to health if the asbestos fibres become airborne in respirable size, are inhaled and lodge deep into the lungs (in the alveoli). Inhalation is the main route of entry to the body. Respirable fibres are fibres that are more likely to reach the small airways and alveolar region of the lung and are defined as having a length of more than five microns, and an aspect ratio (length/width) greater than 3:1.

Asbestos is classified according to the Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) as Carcinogenicity Category 1A (May cause cancer).

There are several asbestos related diseases that may result from the exposure to asbestos which depends on factors such as fibre type; size and shape of fibres; concentration of asbestos fibres in the inhaled air and period of time over which the person was exposed. The asbestos related diseases include:

Asbestosis

Pleural plaques

Malignant mesothelioma of the pleura and peritoneum

Lung cancer

Benign asbestos pleural effusion

Progressive pleural fibrosis (diffuse pleural thickening)

Transpulmonary bands (crow’s feet)

Rounded atelectasis

All asbestos related diseases have a latency period that is the period commencing from the time of the exposure to the asbestos fibres first occurred until symptoms of a disease show. This may range from 10 – 50 years for the asbestos related diseases.

Workplace exposures to asbestos fibres first occurred while mining asbestos, manufacturing asbestos containing products or using those products during the construction of buildings. Currently, the main source of exposure to asbestos fibres is during the maintenance, renovation or demolition of old buildings with asbestos containing materials.

air testing

Asbestos containing materials are subject to environmental weathering which causes them to breakdown and release asbestos fibres. Low levels of airborne asbestos fibres are encountered in the environment from the breakdown of asbestos products. Environmental weathering of asbestos cement sheets in roofing and wall cladding, disturbance of asbestos from a variety of building materials like insulation and asbestos release to air from clutches and brakes in cars and trucks results in asbestos fibres being dispersed in the environment.

According to Australian Government Department of Health website, we are all exposed to low levels of asbestos in the air we breathe every day. Ambient or background air usually contains between 10 and 200 asbestos fibres in every 1000 litres (or cubic metre) of air (equivalent to 0.01 to 0.20 fibres per litre of air). However, most people do not become ill from this exposure, because the levels of asbestos present in the environment are very low. Most people are also exposed to higher levels of asbestos at some time in their lives; for example, in their workplace, community or home. However, for most people, this kind of infrequent exposure is also unlikely to result in any ill effects.

Safe Work Australia states that “the typical environmental background in outdoor air is 0.0005 fibres/ml and 0.0002 fibres/ml in indoor air. The daily inhalation volume for an average adult is 22 m3 or 22000 litres. This means 5500 fibres are breathed/day by the average person (proportion of time spent indoors = 20 hours/day). Despite this the general population does not contract asbestos related disease in significant numbers. The background rate of mesothelioma is less than one per million per year. By comparison, the annual death rate for a 40 year old male in 2008 was 1.6 per thousand or 1600 per million. However, there is no absolutely safe level of exposure to asbestos fibres.

Most people who develop asbestos related diseases were workers who have worked on jobs where they frequently breathed in large amounts of asbestos fibres. As an example, construction workers using unsafe practices in the past may have frequently encountered asbestos fibre levels significantly higher than those levels found in the background. The current workplace exposure standard (time weighted average (TWA) over an eight-hour period) is 0.1 fibres/millilitre of air (100 fibres per litre which is between 500 and 10,000 times the background levels). In the past, workers in asbestos milling or mining often encountered fibre concentrations a million times higher than background levels. In 2011, 606 deaths were caused by mesothelioma and 125 deaths were caused by asbestosis in Australia.

Family members of exposed workers or those who lived close to active asbestos mines in the past are also at risk. A worker exposed to asbestos fibres or a home renovator can carry asbestos fibres on their clothing, boots, skin, hair and tools. Everyone should be alert to ensure they do not become exposed to these fibres.

A very small number of asbestos-related disease cases occur each year in people who have not worked with asbestos products. The low number of cases makes it difficult to determine the exact cause of the disease or the likely exposure event, but unsafe handling of asbestos materials in the home may have contributed to some of these cases.

The uncontrolled disturbance of asbestos containing materials must be avoided at any time to prevent the release of airborne asbestos and increase the risk of exposure to airborne asbestos fibres. The exposure to airborne asbestos fibres should be reduced to as low as reasonably practicable by managing asbestos containing materials in-situ and adopting safe work practices as required by the Work Health &amp; Safety Regulations and Safe Work Australia Codes of Practice “How to Manage &amp; Control Asbestos In the Workplace”: and “ How to Safely Remove Asbestos”.

If you require assistance in asbestos inspection, asbestos testing or asbestos assessment contact SESA on 02 8786 1808.

First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/15-asbestos/asbestos-exposure-risk-of-developing-asbestos-related-disease.html - Comments: 0

Asbestos Exposure & Risk of Developing Asbestos Related - 04 Mar 2018 22:22

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Asbestos is a naturally occurring rock forming mineral silicate in fibrous form belonging to the serpentine and amphibole groups. It occurs naturally in large deposits on every continent in the world. There are six types of naturally occurring asbestos fibres of which only three have been used commercially in Australia. These included the serpentine: Chrysotile (white asbestos); and the amphiboles: Crocidolite (blue asbestos) and Amosite (brown or grey asbestos). The other three non-commercially used amphiboles included Tremolite, Actinolite and Anthophyllite.

Asbestos has been used in the ancient world of the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. It is believed that as early as 4000 BC, asbestos fibres were used for wicks in lamps and candles. Between 2000-3000 BC, embalmed bodies of Egyptian pharaohs were wrapped in asbestos cloth. The Greeks and Romans documented the harmful effects of asbestos fibres on those who mined the silken material from ancient stone quarries noting a “sickness of the lungs” in slaves who wove asbestos into cloth.

The commercial use of asbestos commenced in the late 1800s in Australia in four main industries including Mining and Milling; Building &amp; Construction (for strengthening cement and plastics, for insulation, fireproofing and sound absorption); Ship Building (eg. insulation of boilers and steampipes) and the Automotive Industry (eg. vehicle brake shoes, gaskets and clutch pads).

There were over 3000 products (Asbestos Containing Materials or ACM) manufactured with asbestos fibres. The ACM fall into two broad categories: friable and non-friable (or bonded).

‘Friable’ is ACM that can be easily reduced to powder when crushed by hand, when dry. These materials can contain higher percentages of asbestos fibres and are easily or more likely to release airborne fibres into the environment with minimal disturbance. As such, they pose a greater risk to health. Friable materials must only be handled and removed by an asbestos removalist with Class A Asbestos Removal Licence. Examples of friable asbestos-containing materials include sprayed on fire retardants, insulation (eg. millboard, pipe insulation), sound proofing, the lining on some old domestic heaters, stoves and hot water systems and associated pipe lagging, the backing of sheet vinyl and linoleum floor coverings, thermal lagging, some vermiculite.

‘Non-friable’, or bonded ACM is used to refer to ACM in which the asbestos is firmly bound in the matrix of the material. These materials are unlikely to release measurable levels of airborne asbestos fibre into the environment if they are undisturbed. Therefore, they generally pose a lower risk to health. However, activities that may abrade the ACM such as drilling, grinding have the potential to release higher concentrations of airborne asbestos fibres into the environment. The non-friable ACM are mainly made up of asbestos fibres together with a bonding compound (such as cement), and typically contain up to 15 per cent asbestos. Non-friable ACM are solid, quite rigid and the asbestos fibres are tightly bound in the material. Non-friable ACM are the most common in domestic houses. They are commonly called ‘fibro’, ‘asbestos cement’ and ‘AC sheeting’. Examples of non-friable ACM include asbestos cement products (flat, profiled and corrugated sheeting used in walls, ceilings and roofs, moulded items such as downpipes) and vinyl floor tiles.

While asbestos is a hazardous material it can only pose a risk to health if the asbestos fibres become airborne in respirable size, are inhaled and lodge deep into the lungs (in the alveoli). Inhalation is the main route of entry to the body. Respirable fibres are fibres that are more likely to reach the small airways and alveolar region of the lung and are defined as having a length of more than five microns, and an aspect ratio (length/width) greater than 3:1.

Asbestos is classified according to the Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) as Carcinogenicity Category 1A (May cause cancer).

There are several asbestos related diseases that may result from the exposure to asbestos which depends on factors such as fibre type; size and shape of fibres; concentration of asbestos fibres in the inhaled air and period of time over which the person was exposed. The asbestos related diseases include:

Asbestosis

Pleural plaques

Malignant mesothelioma of the pleura and peritoneum

Lung cancer

Benign asbestos pleural effusion

Progressive pleural fibrosis (diffuse pleural thickening)

Transpulmonary bands (crow’s feet)

Rounded atelectasis

All asbestos related diseases have a latency period that is the period commencing from the time of the exposure to the asbestos fibres first occurred until symptoms of a disease show. This may range from 10 – 50 years for the asbestos related diseases.

Workplace exposures to asbestos fibres first occurred while mining asbestos, manufacturing asbestos containing products or using those products during the construction of buildings. Currently, the main source of exposure to asbestos fibres is during the maintenance, renovation or demolition of old buildings with asbestos containing materials.

Asbestos containing materials are subject to environmental weathering which causes them to breakdown and release asbestos fibres. Low levels of airborne asbestos fibres are encountered in the environment from the breakdown of asbestos products. Environmental weathering of asbestos cement sheets in roofing and wall cladding, disturbance of asbestos from a variety of building materials like insulation and asbestos release to air from clutches and brakes in cars and trucks results in asbestos fibres being dispersed in the environment.

According to Australian Government Department of Health website, we are all exposed to low levels of asbestos in the air we breathe every day. Ambient or background air usually contains between 10 and 200 asbestos fibres in every 1000 litres (or cubic metre) of air (equivalent to 0.01 to 0.20 fibres per litre of air). However, most people do not become ill from this exposure, because the levels of asbestos present in the environment are very low. Most people are also exposed to higher levels of asbestos at some time in their lives; for example, in their workplace, community or home. However, for most people, this kind of infrequent exposure is also unlikely to result in any ill effects.

Safe Work Australia states that “the typical environmental background in outdoor air is 0.0005 fibres/ml and 0.0002 fibres/ml in indoor air. The daily inhalation volume for an average adult is 22 m3 or 22000 litres. This means 5500 fibres are breathed/day by the average person (proportion of time spent indoors = 20 hours/day). Despite this the general population does not contract asbestos related disease in significant numbers. The background rate of mesothelioma is less than one per million per year. By comparison, the annual death rate for a 40 year old male in 2008 was 1.6 per thousand or 1600 per million. However, there is no absolutely safe level of exposure to asbestos fibres.

Most people who develop asbestos related diseases were workers who have worked on jobs where they frequently breathed in large amounts of asbestos fibres. As an example, construction workers using unsafe practices in the past may have frequently encountered asbestos fibre levels significantly higher than those levels found in the background. The current workplace exposure standard (time weighted average (TWA) over an eight-hour period) is 0.1 fibres/millilitre of air (100 fibres per litre which is between 500 and 10,000 times the background levels). In the past, workers in asbestos milling or mining often encountered fibre concentrations a million times higher than background levels. In 2011, 606 deaths were caused by mesothelioma and 125 deaths were caused by asbestosis in Australia.

Family members of exposed workers or those who lived close to active asbestos mines in the past are also at risk. A worker exposed to asbestos fibres or a home renovator can carry asbestos fibres on their clothing, boots, skin, hair and tools. Everyone should be alert to ensure they do not become exposed to these fibres.

A very small number of asbestos-related disease cases occur each year in people who have not worked with asbestos products. The low number of cases makes it difficult to determine the exact cause of the disease or the likely exposure event, but unsafe handling of asbestos materials in the home may have contributed to some of these cases.

SESA

The uncontrolled disturbance of asbestos containing materials must be avoided at any time to prevent the release of airborne asbestos and increase the risk of exposure to airborne asbestos fibres. The exposure to airborne asbestos fibres should be reduced to as low as reasonably practicable by managing asbestos containing materials in-situ and adopting safe work practices as required by the Work Health &amp; Safety Regulations and Safe Work Australia Codes of Practice “How to Manage &amp; Control Asbestos In the Workplace”: and “ How to Safely Remove Asbestos”.

If you require assistance in asbestos inspection, asbestos testing or asbestos assessment contact SESA on 02 8786 1808.

First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/15-asbestos/asbestos-exposure-risk-of-developing-asbestos-related-disease.html - Comments: 0

Asbestos Exposure & Risk of Developing Asbestos Related - 04 Mar 2018 21:25

Tags:

Asbestos is a naturally occurring rock forming mineral silicate in fibrous form belonging to the serpentine and amphibole groups. It occurs naturally in large deposits on every continent in the world. There are six types of naturally occurring asbestos fibres of which only three have been used commercially in Australia. These included the serpentine: Chrysotile (white asbestos); and the amphiboles: Crocidolite (blue asbestos) and Amosite (brown or grey asbestos). The other three non-commercially used amphiboles included Tremolite, Actinolite and Anthophyllite.

Asbestos has been used in the ancient world of the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. It is believed that as early as 4000 BC, asbestos fibres were used for wicks in lamps and candles. Between 2000-3000 BC, embalmed bodies of Egyptian pharaohs were wrapped in asbestos cloth. The Greeks and Romans documented the harmful effects of asbestos fibres on those who mined the silken material from ancient stone quarries noting a “sickness of the lungs” in slaves who wove asbestos into cloth.

The commercial use of asbestos commenced in the late 1800s in Australia in four main industries including Mining and Milling; Building &amp; Construction (for strengthening cement and plastics, for insulation, fireproofing and sound absorption); Ship Building (eg. insulation of boilers and steampipes) and the Automotive Industry (eg. vehicle brake shoes, gaskets and clutch pads).

There were over 3000 products (Asbestos Containing Materials or ACM) manufactured with asbestos fibres. The ACM fall into two broad categories: friable and non-friable (or bonded).

‘Friable’ is ACM that can be easily reduced to powder when crushed by hand, when dry. These materials can contain higher percentages of asbestos fibres and are easily or more likely to release airborne fibres into the environment with minimal disturbance. As such, they pose a greater risk to health. Friable materials must only be handled and removed by an asbestos removalist with Class A Asbestos Removal Licence. Examples of friable asbestos-containing materials include sprayed on fire retardants, insulation (eg. millboard, pipe insulation), sound proofing, the lining on some old domestic heaters, stoves and hot water systems and associated pipe lagging, the backing of sheet vinyl and linoleum floor coverings, thermal lagging, some vermiculite.

‘Non-friable’, or bonded ACM is used to refer to ACM in which the asbestos is firmly bound in the matrix of the material. These materials are unlikely to release measurable levels of airborne asbestos fibre into the environment if they are undisturbed. Therefore, they generally pose a lower risk to health. However, activities that may abrade the ACM such as drilling, grinding have the potential to release higher concentrations of airborne asbestos fibres into the environment. The non-friable ACM are mainly made up of asbestos fibres together with a bonding compound (such as cement), and typically contain up to 15 per cent asbestos. Non-friable ACM are solid, quite rigid and the asbestos fibres are tightly bound in the material. Non-friable ACM are the most common in domestic houses. They are commonly called ‘fibro’, ‘asbestos cement’ and ‘AC sheeting’. Examples of non-friable ACM include asbestos cement products (flat, profiled and corrugated sheeting used in walls, ceilings and roofs, moulded items such as downpipes) and vinyl floor tiles.

While asbestos is a hazardous material it can only pose a risk to health if the asbestos fibres become airborne in respirable size, are inhaled and lodge deep into the lungs (in the alveoli). Inhalation is the main route of entry to the body. Respirable fibres are fibres that are more likely to reach the small airways and alveolar region of the lung and are defined as having a length of more than five microns, and an aspect ratio (length/width) greater than 3:1.

Asbestos is classified according to the Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) as Carcinogenicity Category 1A (May cause cancer).

There are several asbestos related diseases that may result from the exposure to asbestos which depends on factors such as fibre type; size and shape of fibres; concentration of asbestos fibres in the inhaled air and period of time over which the person was exposed. The asbestos related diseases include:

Asbestosis

Pleural plaques

Malignant mesothelioma of the pleura and peritoneum

Lung cancer

Benign asbestos pleural effusion

Progressive pleural fibrosis (diffuse pleural thickening)

Transpulmonary bands (crow’s feet)

Rounded atelectasis

Lead Paint Testing

All asbestos related diseases have a latency period that is the period commencing from the time of the exposure to the asbestos fibres first occurred until symptoms of a disease show. This may range from 10 – 50 years for the asbestos related diseases.

Workplace exposures to asbestos fibres first occurred while mining asbestos, manufacturing asbestos containing products or using those products during the construction of buildings. Currently, the main source of exposure to asbestos fibres is during the maintenance, renovation or demolition of old buildings with asbestos containing materials.

Asbestos containing materials are subject to environmental weathering which causes them to breakdown and release asbestos fibres. Low levels of airborne asbestos fibres are encountered in the environment from the breakdown of asbestos products. Environmental weathering of asbestos cement sheets in roofing and wall cladding, disturbance of asbestos from a variety of building materials like insulation and asbestos release to air from clutches and brakes in cars and trucks results in asbestos fibres being dispersed in the environment.

According to Australian Government Department of Health website, we are all exposed to low levels of asbestos in the air we breathe every day. Ambient or background air usually contains between 10 and 200 asbestos fibres in every 1000 litres (or cubic metre) of air (equivalent to 0.01 to 0.20 fibres per litre of air). However, most people do not become ill from this exposure, because the levels of asbestos present in the environment are very low. Most people are also exposed to higher levels of asbestos at some time in their lives; for example, in their workplace, community or home. However, for most people, this kind of infrequent exposure is also unlikely to result in any ill effects.

Safe Work Australia states that “the typical environmental background in outdoor air is 0.0005 fibres/ml and 0.0002 fibres/ml in indoor air. The daily inhalation volume for an average adult is 22 m3 or 22000 litres. This means 5500 fibres are breathed/day by the average person (proportion of time spent indoors = 20 hours/day). Despite this the general population does not contract asbestos related disease in significant numbers. The background rate of mesothelioma is less than one per million per year. By comparison, the annual death rate for a 40 year old male in 2008 was 1.6 per thousand or 1600 per million. However, there is no absolutely safe level of exposure to asbestos fibres.

Most people who develop asbestos related diseases were workers who have worked on jobs where they frequently breathed in large amounts of asbestos fibres. As an example, construction workers using unsafe practices in the past may have frequently encountered asbestos fibre levels significantly higher than those levels found in the background. The current workplace exposure standard (time weighted average (TWA) over an eight-hour period) is 0.1 fibres/millilitre of air (100 fibres per litre which is between 500 and 10,000 times the background levels). In the past, workers in asbestos milling or mining often encountered fibre concentrations a million times higher than background levels. In 2011, 606 deaths were caused by mesothelioma and 125 deaths were caused by asbestosis in Australia.

Family members of exposed workers or those who lived close to active asbestos mines in the past are also at risk. A worker exposed to asbestos fibres or a home renovator can carry asbestos fibres on their clothing, boots, skin, hair and tools. Everyone should be alert to ensure they do not become exposed to these fibres.

A very small number of asbestos-related disease cases occur each year in people who have not worked with asbestos products. The low number of cases makes it difficult to determine the exact cause of the disease or the likely exposure event, but unsafe handling of asbestos materials in the home may have contributed to some of these cases.

The uncontrolled disturbance of asbestos containing materials must be avoided at any time to prevent the release of airborne asbestos and increase the risk of exposure to airborne asbestos fibres. The exposure to airborne asbestos fibres should be reduced to as low as reasonably practicable by managing asbestos containing materials in-situ and adopting safe work practices as required by the Work Health &amp; Safety Regulations and Safe Work Australia Codes of Practice “How to Manage &amp; Control Asbestos In the Workplace”: and “ How to Safely Remove Asbestos”.

If you require assistance in asbestos inspection, asbestos testing or asbestos assessment contact SESA on 02 8786 1808.

First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/15-asbestos/asbestos-exposure-risk-of-developing-asbestos-related-disease.html - Comments: 0

Succeed In Your Business By Being The Best In Search En - 25 Feb 2018 18:03

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Online success flows from rising high in the search engines' rankings and staying there, which you already know if you have an established website. In this article, we will focus on a number of ideas that will help you update your SEO tactics to give you the best possible search engine ratings.

A quick grounding in the basics of search engine optimization should come first. In a perfect world, people would get to choose how websites are ranked. However, in the online world, computers determine the rankings. The point of SEO is to establish your site with a high enough ranking that it will garner a great number of visitors.

To rank your website, search engines employ several methods. Keywords present on your site will be taken into account by the search engine. It also looks into your site's activity and the links to and from your site.

It takes time to achieve a high search rank. As a start, take the time to build your website properly so that search engines can easily understand it. If you include your keywords repeatedly, within all aspects on your site, especially throughout your main content, the search engines will reward you with increased page rank on those terms.

When you search for something on a search engine, you might have noticed the &quot;featured results&quot; that pop up. To get your site to appear with this results, you could pay a company an affordable price. Buying these featured slots is the only way to directly pay for better search rankings.

SEO is more than just using the right keywords and including special clusters in your content. The links that you exchange with other websites, as well as the links that are contained internally within your own pages, will assist in getting your site noticed and even ranked higher. Collect backlinks by forging relationships with other webmasters and making reciprocal link agreements.

To generate profit, it is important to get targeted visitors to your website. Targeted visitors are basically visitors that you are most likely to covert into customers. Of course, you will always have random guests too. Unfortunately, these visitors rarely produce any actual sales. In order for you to attract customers that are searching for your products or services, you must have the correct search terms within your content. You can also increase your chances for success by adding your advertisements to websites that customers will likely visit regularly.

A great website will be critical to your business. If your business is sustained through sales, a well designed website is not just a nice thing to have, it's a requirement! Try to use these tips to improve your site. - Comments: 0

Asbestos Exposure & Risk of Developing Asbestos Related - 24 Feb 2018 04:28

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Asbestos is a naturally occurring rock forming mineral silicate in fibrous form belonging to the serpentine and amphibole groups. It occurs naturally in large deposits on every continent in the world. There are six types of naturally occurring asbestos fibres of which only three have been used commercially in Australia. These included the serpentine: Chrysotile (white asbestos); and the amphiboles: Crocidolite (blue asbestos) and Amosite (brown or grey asbestos). The other three non-commercially used amphiboles included Tremolite, Actinolite and Anthophyllite.

Asbestos has been used in the ancient world of the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. It is believed that as early as 4000 BC, asbestos fibres were used for wicks in lamps and candles. Between 2000-3000 BC, embalmed bodies of Egyptian pharaohs were wrapped in asbestos cloth. The Greeks and Romans documented the harmful effects of asbestos fibres on those who mined the silken material from ancient stone quarries noting a “sickness of the lungs” in slaves who wove asbestos into cloth.

SESA

The commercial use of asbestos commenced in the late 1800s in Australia in four main industries including Mining and Milling; Building &amp; Construction (for strengthening cement and plastics, for insulation, fireproofing and sound absorption); Ship Building (eg. insulation of boilers and steampipes) and the Automotive Industry (eg. vehicle brake shoes, gaskets and clutch pads).

There were over 3000 products (Asbestos Containing Materials or ACM) manufactured with asbestos fibres. The ACM fall into two broad categories: friable and non-friable (or bonded).

‘Friable’ is ACM that can be easily reduced to powder when crushed by hand, when dry. These materials can contain higher percentages of asbestos fibres and are easily or more likely to release airborne fibres into the environment with minimal disturbance. As such, they pose a greater risk to health. Friable materials must only be handled and removed by an asbestos removalist with Class A Asbestos Removal Licence. Examples of friable asbestos-containing materials include sprayed on fire retardants, insulation (eg. millboard, pipe insulation), sound proofing, the lining on some old domestic heaters, stoves and hot water systems and associated pipe lagging, the backing of sheet vinyl and linoleum floor coverings, thermal lagging, some vermiculite.

‘Non-friable’, or bonded ACM is used to refer to ACM in which the asbestos is firmly bound in the matrix of the material. These materials are unlikely to release measurable levels of airborne asbestos fibre into the environment if they are undisturbed. Therefore, they generally pose a lower risk to health. However, activities that may abrade the ACM such as drilling, grinding have the potential to release higher concentrations of airborne asbestos fibres into the environment. The non-friable ACM are mainly made up of asbestos fibres together with a bonding compound (such as cement), and typically contain up to 15 per cent asbestos. Non-friable ACM are solid, quite rigid and the asbestos fibres are tightly bound in the material. Non-friable ACM are the most common in domestic houses. They are commonly called ‘fibro’, ‘asbestos cement’ and ‘AC sheeting’. Examples of non-friable ACM include asbestos cement products (flat, profiled and corrugated sheeting used in walls, ceilings and roofs, moulded items such as downpipes) and vinyl floor tiles.

While asbestos is a hazardous material it can only pose a risk to health if the asbestos fibres become airborne in respirable size, are inhaled and lodge deep into the lungs (in the alveoli). Inhalation is the main route of entry to the body. Respirable fibres are fibres that are more likely to reach the small airways and alveolar region of the lung and are defined as having a length of more than five microns, and an aspect ratio (length/width) greater than 3:1.

Asbestos is classified according to the Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) as Carcinogenicity Category 1A (May cause cancer).

There are several asbestos related diseases that may result from the exposure to asbestos which depends on factors such as fibre type; size and shape of fibres; concentration of asbestos fibres in the inhaled air and period of time over which the person was exposed. The asbestos related diseases include:

Asbestosis

Pleural plaques

Malignant mesothelioma of the pleura and peritoneum

Lung cancer

Benign asbestos pleural effusion

Progressive pleural fibrosis (diffuse pleural thickening)

Transpulmonary bands (crow’s feet)

Rounded atelectasis

All asbestos related diseases have a latency period that is the period commencing from the time of the exposure to the asbestos fibres first occurred until symptoms of a disease show. This may range from 10 – 50 years for the asbestos related diseases.

Workplace exposures to asbestos fibres first occurred while mining asbestos, manufacturing asbestos containing products or using those products during the construction of buildings. Currently, the main source of exposure to asbestos fibres is during the maintenance, renovation or demolition of old buildings with asbestos containing materials.

Asbestos containing materials are subject to environmental weathering which causes them to breakdown and release asbestos fibres. Low levels of airborne asbestos fibres are encountered in the environment from the breakdown of asbestos products. Environmental weathering of asbestos cement sheets in roofing and wall cladding, disturbance of asbestos from a variety of building materials like insulation and asbestos release to air from clutches and brakes in cars and trucks results in asbestos fibres being dispersed in the environment.

According to Australian Government Department of Health website, we are all exposed to low levels of asbestos in the air we breathe every day. Ambient or background air usually contains between 10 and 200 asbestos fibres in every 1000 litres (or cubic metre) of air (equivalent to 0.01 to 0.20 fibres per litre of air). However, most people do not become ill from this exposure, because the levels of asbestos present in the environment are very low. Most people are also exposed to higher levels of asbestos at some time in their lives; for example, in their workplace, community or home. However, for most people, this kind of infrequent exposure is also unlikely to result in any ill effects.

Safe Work Australia states that “the typical environmental background in outdoor air is 0.0005 fibres/ml and 0.0002 fibres/ml in indoor air. The daily inhalation volume for an average adult is 22 m3 or 22000 litres. This means 5500 fibres are breathed/day by the average person (proportion of time spent indoors = 20 hours/day). Despite this the general population does not contract asbestos related disease in significant numbers. The background rate of mesothelioma is less than one per million per year. By comparison, the annual death rate for a 40 year old male in 2008 was 1.6 per thousand or 1600 per million. However, there is no absolutely safe level of exposure to asbestos fibres.

Most people who develop asbestos related diseases were workers who have worked on jobs where they frequently breathed in large amounts of asbestos fibres. As an example, construction workers using unsafe practices in the past may have frequently encountered asbestos fibre levels significantly higher than those levels found in the background. The current workplace exposure standard (time weighted average (TWA) over an eight-hour period) is 0.1 fibres/millilitre of air (100 fibres per litre which is between 500 and 10,000 times the background levels). In the past, workers in asbestos milling or mining often encountered fibre concentrations a million times higher than background levels. In 2011, 606 deaths were caused by mesothelioma and 125 deaths were caused by asbestosis in Australia.

Family members of exposed workers or those who lived close to active asbestos mines in the past are also at risk. A worker exposed to asbestos fibres or a home renovator can carry asbestos fibres on their clothing, boots, skin, hair and tools. Everyone should be alert to ensure they do not become exposed to these fibres.

A very small number of asbestos-related disease cases occur each year in people who have not worked with asbestos products. The low number of cases makes it difficult to determine the exact cause of the disease or the likely exposure event, but unsafe handling of asbestos materials in the home may have contributed to some of these cases.

The uncontrolled disturbance of asbestos containing materials must be avoided at any time to prevent the release of airborne asbestos and increase the risk of exposure to airborne asbestos fibres. The exposure to airborne asbestos fibres should be reduced to as low as reasonably practicable by managing asbestos containing materials in-situ and adopting safe work practices as required by the Work Health &amp; Safety Regulations and Safe Work Australia Codes of Practice “How to Manage &amp; Control Asbestos In the Workplace”: and “ How to Safely Remove Asbestos”.

If you require assistance in asbestos inspection, asbestos testing or asbestos assessment contact SESA on 02 8786 1808.

First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/15-asbestos/asbestos-exposure-risk-of-developing-asbestos-related-disease.html - Comments: 0

Teach Your Youngsters How To Create Their Own Garden An - 18 Feb 2018 07:35

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http://www.thetutuguru.com.au/garden-info/plant-factsheets/rhubarb/

Children usually like to help until it has been taken away from them, so tell them how to garden. It really is almost a no-brainer as it involves children having fun and becoming dirty. Consider how exciting it's going to be for them, when you let them pick the plant they want to grow. We are going to have a look at some ways to help your kids become great gardeners.

When selecting a plant for the garden, it can be easiest to have them choose between a general group of plants. Have several flowers or plants with vibrant colors, given that that is what most of them will like. Kinds of vivid flowers that children would enjoy include zinnias and cosmos. There might be something that could be bigger than them like a sunflower plant. You do have to know which plants may cause allergic reactions. Even though your kids may be small, they could nevertheless help with planting the seeds. At least, they could just simply handle the soil. Having the children create a gardening log is a great way to keep them excited about their garden. They can record their progress or draw what their plants are going to look like. They might record when they planted and when the seeds began to sprout.

When possible, you might want to have the garden near their play location so they can always see their plants growing. This approach will guarantee that your children will remain excited and enthusiastic. Since kids love dirt, you might help them prepare the soil. It's possible to have them have fun with games where they tramp out all the clumped up soil. You should also acquire tools that are small enough so that they can hold. Let their own section of the garden be theirs. Use a picture of each plant, so they will recognize what to look for when it starts growing. You could also have a small sign with your children's names on it so they feel ownership of the garden.

You should also have your children water their own plants. You might have to assist them, or at least show them exactly how to do it, so the roots of the plants get watered. A little can that may be used for watering is going to work best. Children are likely to make errors as they tend their garden, which is a good way for them to learn. Aside from having a good time making a mess, you should teach your children the importance of cleaning up after they have finished with gardening.

When you let your children to have their own space, and let them have fun, they will see gardening as something fun to do. In every step, they will likely make mistakes but they will probably learn and you can guide them through. - Comments: 0

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